Thursday, September 20, 2007

The Grammarian, VIII



I've always wanted to ask this: Just what is a Concordia Self-Study Bible, anyway? Yeah, I know it's a Bible with study notes in it so that you can study the Bible on your own, by yourself. But wouldn't such a Bible be better called a Concordia Bible with Notes? or with Study Guide?

OK, class, let us look at the grammar here: self-study can mean, according to the dictionary, either the study of something by oneself or the study of oneself. Granted, the former is likely meant by the designation, but now, who can tell me what we know about phases which can have two meanings? . . .

That it's all right as long as there is no ambiguity presented by the context. What about the Concordia Self-Study Bible, then? No problem, you say? Well actually, the first person I asked to tell me what he thought it meant said something about using the Bible to study oneself! Aha! Ambiguity!

Therefore, I wonder: perhaps the the Concordia Self-Study Bible was so designated to indicate any of the following:

1) that with it you can study the Bible by yourself
2) (corollary) that without it you could not study the Bible by yourself
3) (another corollary) that it is the notes which are the big thing in this Bible
4) that with it you can learn to study yourself, and find out about yourself
5) that it is Bible meant especially for people engaged in the practice of "self-study"
5) that it is an amazing book which actually studies itself, and doesn't need to be opened
6) that it is a Bible which contains studies of the word "self"
Let's see, have we left any meanings out? . . .

7 comments:

solarblogger said...

I vote for the second #5. The Bible studies itself so you don't have to.

This is one of the good reasons that they waited till long after that came out to put out the LSB. Otherwise we would have the Concordia Self-Singing Hymnal. Don't leave it open, people!

And then there's the Concordia Small Self-Catechizing Catechism. Some of those have gotten confused and thought they were self-examining, too. But most pastors insist on examining them before admitting them to Holy Communion.

Fr. Matthew J. Uttenreither said...

I choose none of the above. I'm waiting for the complete Orthodox Study Bible. If I'm going to have notes under my English it better be the Fathers and not some CPH rendered note.

Father Eckardt said...

Perhaps its a study of Concordia's self . . .

Anonymous said...

One of the good things about it is that it sometimes brings out what the Greek actually says, for instance one place in Acts, "He must remain in heaven," and Ephesians 4, "pastors and teachers" refers to one thing: teaching shepherds, aka pastors.
Brian Westgate

Father Eckardt said...

Then again, as Venkman pointed out on my previous blog, here's the Concordia interpretation of Paul's "'I kneel'": they say it "expresses deep emotion and reverence, as people in Paul's day usually stood to pray." Oh, I seet. Paul says he knelt, but he didn't really kneel.

Venkman said...

I heard that if you practice self study too often, you'll go blind.

Father Eckardt said...

True, and if somebody startles you during self study you'll get stuck that way the rest of your life.